Berlin

Berlin

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Berlin, Germany’s capital, dates to the 13th century. Reminders of the city's turbulent 20th-century history include its Holocaust memorial and the Berlin Wall's graffitied remains. In Berlin a fast paced metropolis and relaxing rest areas in nature are not far apart. Whether in Tiergarten, Tempelhofer Freiheit, Görlitzer Park or Grunewald – every district has its “green oasis”, which improves the quality of living and allows visitors to take a short break. It is the diversity, the contrasts and the sheer inexhaustible potential of this capital city to consistently fire the enthusiasm of its visitors from all over the world. People are excited by the mixture of history and Zeitgeist, the broad spectrum of art, culture, music, entertainment and shopping facilities. The modern hotel landscape, the diversity of its cuisine and its outstanding cost-effectiveness by comparison to other destinations in Europe also go to make up the special charm that is the metropolis on the Spree.


Cologne

Cologne

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Cologne (Köln) offers seemingly endless attractions, led by its famous cathedral whose filigree twin spires dominate the skyline. It’s regularly voted the country’s single most popular tourist attraction. The city’s museum landscape is especially strong when it comes to art; but also has something in store for fans of chocolate, sports and even Roman history. Its people are well known for their liberalism and joie de vivre; and it’s easy to have a good time right along with them year-round in the beer halls of the Altstadt (old town) or during the springtime Carnival.Cologne is like a 3D textbook on history and architecture. Drifting about town you’ll stumble upon an ancient Roman wall, medieval churches galore, nondescript postwar buildings, avant-garde structures and even a new postmodern quarter right on the Rhine. It grew into a major trading centre, a tradition it solidified in the Middle Ages and continues to uphold today.


Dresden

Dresden

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Dresden is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Germany. Visitors from all over the world pour into the city on the Elbe to explore and experience it, and to see for themselves the Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady), the Zwinger and the Semperoper (Semper Opera House).The city not only has a strong cultural attraction, it is also the political, economic and scientific centre of the Free State of Saxony. It was the love of art of the Electors of Saxony that turned the Elbe valley into a unique cultural landscape. It is thanks to this spirit of innovation and desire for continual progress that this tradition has been continued right up to the present day. And so today beautiful historic buildings stand alongside award-winning modern architecture.Art, culture and its position on the river, combined with its lasting beauty and things both new and rediscovered, all contribute to the fascination of the city of Dresden, which is constantly reinventing itself.


Landungsbrücken

Landungsbrücken

Hamburg - Germany

The floating jetty - called "Landungsbrücken" - is 700 meters long. From this water "station" start the harbor round trips, the harbor ferries and the HADAG steamers to Finkenwerder, Oevelgönne and Blankenese. Even imposing luxury cruisers are here from time to time.If you are here - the water on the one hand, colorful souvenir shops with watercant memories and quaint fish restaurants with fresh cuttings or northern sea shrimp on the other side - easily forgetting that it moves on floating ground. The first pontoons were built in 1839, serving steamboats as a jetty because they could store the coal they needed for their propulsion. Likewise, the fire in their kettles as a potential source of danger was far enough away from the actual port. From 1907 to 1909 the plant was extremely enlarged - and severely damaged in the Second World War. Today's investor area has existed since the rebuilding of 1953 to 1955, and for a cinema thriller even a car drove in extreme speed over the bridges. The tower on the east side of the water station also displays the water level next to the time and hits the ship bell every half hour.


Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle

Fussen - Germany

The Neuschwanstein Castle is one of the most visited castles in Germany and one of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe.The castle is located in Bavaria, near the town of Fussen. It was built by King Ludwig II of Bavaria, also known as the “Fairytale King”.The two story throne room was designed in Byzantine style, with wall paintings depicting angels. Ironically, there is no throne in the Throne Room, as Ludwig died before it was completely finished.This fairytale look of the Neuschwanstein castle inspired Walt Disney to create the Magic Kingdom. Today, Neuschwanstein is the most visited castle in Germany, and one of the most popular tourist destination in the world. Every year over 1.300.000 people cross its gate. Neuschwanstein Castle is definitely one of the most charming castles.


Frankfurt

Frankfurt

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Frankfurt, a central German city on the river Main, is a major financial hub that's home to the European Central Bank. It's the birthplace of famed writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, whose former home is now the Goethe House Museum. Like much of the city, it was damaged during World War II and later rebuilt. The reconstructed Altstadt (Old Town) is the site of the Römerberg, a square that hosts an annual Christmas market. In terms of visitor numbers and size, the Frankfurt Christmas Market is one of the largest Christmas markets in all of Germany. The elaborate and creative stand decorations, the scenic surroundings on the Römerberg and St Paul's Square and the huge Christmas tree combine to also make it one of Germany's most beautiful.


Heidelberg

Heidelberg

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Heidelberg is a city that will capture your heart. Famous the world over, it is a perennial favourite among international tourists. The city has so much to offer: charm and character in abundance between the Old Bridge and the mighty castle, an unparalleled choice of culture and entertainment, hearty yet heavenly cuisine and a picturesque setting nestled between the Neckar river and the foothills of the Odenwald forest.The permanent exhibition at the Documentation and Cultural Centre for German Sinti and Roma sheds light on the lives and fates of these people and serves as a poignant reminder of the Nazi-era genocide. At the centre of the old town is the market square, where you'll find another of Heidelberg's many beautiful fountains, alongside grand period houses, lots of cafés and even more pretty little shops.


Munich

Munich

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Munich, Bavaria’s capital, is home to centuries-old buildings and numerous museums. Here's the Glockenspiel on Munich. Set at the foot of the Bavarian Alps. the city is a mix of rustic tradition, modern life and at times, a somber history.Munich is best known the world over for its incredibly rambunctious Oktoberfest. For 16 days, the city becomes a giant keg party. For years, the fest has followed a traditional calendar of events. On the first Saturday, the tapping of the first beer barrel by the Munich Mayor. On the last Sunday, fireworks commence in the Theresienwiese, the fest's main field.Munich's location allows travelers to take advantage of easy rail travel to lakes, forests and metropolitan cities such as Salzburg. Zurich or Vienna along with easy access to the famous Romantic Road. a picturesque journey through the medieval villages of lower Germany.


Deutsches Eck

Deutsches Eck

Koblenz - Germany

Koblenz: the German Corner and a national heirloom.At the famous Deutsches Eck, or German Corner, where the Rhine and Moselle converge, lies one of Germany's oldest and most beautiful towns – Koblenz. Vineyards, forests and four mountain ranges form the backdrop to the city, whose 2,000-year history has given rise to beautiful churches and castles, palatial residences and grand town houses.People come to Koblenz from all over the world to soak up this charm amid the narrow lanes, tucked-away corners and delightful city squares. A stroll through the old quarter could begin at the four towers, as the oriels of four baroque houses are known – one on each corner of the area's main street crossing. The Deutscher Kaiser is also worth a visit. This is not another monument as its name might suggest, but a Gothic tower house that now boasts a delightful restaurant on the ground floor. Your boat passes by the Electoral Palace en route to this most impressive example of early Prussian art and cultural history. The people of Koblenz appreciate contemporary art as well, as is clear from the Ludwig Museum close to the Deutsches Eck.


Düsseldorf

Düsseldorf

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Düsseldorf is a city in western Germany known for its fashion industry and art scene. It's divided by the Rhine River, with its Altstadt (Old Town) on the east bank and modern commercial areas to the west. In the Altstadt, St. Lambertus Church and Schlossturm (Castle Tower) both date to the 13th century. Streets such as Königsallee and Schadowstrasse are lined with boutique shops. It’s no wonder Düsseldorf’s Altstadt has gained a reputation for being the ‘longest bar in the world’. The Old Town is a very lively place for a night out, but if you’re looking for more cultural events, the Düsseldorf tourist office can provide information on what's on. Düsseldorf is in the fortunate position of being able to entertain and surprise its visitors with a wide variety of sights to see. Our top six are listed here along with a few ideas for people who wish to explore Düsseldorf independently.



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