Paris

Paris

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Paris offers the largest concentration  of tourist attractions in France, and possibly in Europe. Besides some of the world's most famous musuems, its has a vibrant historic city centre, a beautiful riverscape, an extensive range of historic monuments, including cathedrals, chapels and palaces, plus one of the most famous nightlife scenes in the world.  Paris is also famous for its cafés and restaurants, its theatres and cinemas, and its general ambiance. While there are a thousand other things to do in Paris apart from those mentioned on this page, for the traveller spending just a few days in Paris   , this list offers more than enough choice to fill the time.The Eiffel tower - take the lift to the top, for a spectacular panorama of Paris. The most carefree option is to just stroll down the Champs Elysées and along the banks of the Seine, looking at the lights and the illuminated monuments that can often be seen from afar.


Mont Saint-Michel

Mont Saint-Michel

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A magical island topped by a gravity-defying medieval monastery, the Mont-Saint-Michel counts among France’s most stunning sights. Set in the mesmerising bay where Normandy and Brittany merge, the island draws the eye from great distances.The staggering location has long inspired awe and the imagination. The story of how the mount turned into a great place of Christian pilgrimage is colourful. Vast numbers of pilgrims visited, despite warring cross-Channel royals. Recently, the visitor car parks have been relocated away from the shoreline, to preserve the Mont-Saint-Michel’s exceptional surrounds.


French Riviera

French Riviera

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The French Riviera is the Mediterranean coast of southeastern France. It includes famously glamorous beach resorts such as Saint-Tropez and Cannes, and the independent microstate of Monaco. A health retreat in the 18th century, the area later attracted aristocrats, artists and the 1960s "jet set." Today it’s an established holiday destination, with paths connecting many coastal villages and towns. French Riviera is a major tourist attraction. Situated at and to the east of the point where the Alps meet the Mediteranean,  it is an area that enjoys a wonderfully mild to warm climate all year round, despite being one of the more northerly coasts on the whole Mediterranean.  For much of this period, resorts and beaches are not overcrowded, since they are set up to cope for the summer holiday crowds; but July and August are very busy, and during this period advanced booking for hotels, camping sites and even bed and breakfast is highly advisable and in many places essential.


Loire Valley

Loire Valley

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The Loire Valley, France is best known as being the home to many important castles. Many of these date from the 15th to 17th centuries when the region was much loved by many of the French Kings and noblemen, who competed to build ever more elaborate and luxurious chateaux.The Loire Valley moves to the beat of its many music festivals, the most popular being the Printemps de Bourges. Jazz plays an important role in this area, which is showcased in the Jazz en Touraine festival and the Jazz en Val de Cher festival. Although the whole reagion is quite extensive, the part of most interest to visitors including the Loire Valley world heritage site, the most famous renaissance castles and several of the most attractive towns, is a small enough area to be explored in a single visit.


Bordeaux

Bordeaux

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Bordeaux, hub of the famed wine-growing region, is a port city on the Garonne River in southwestern France. It’s known for its Gothic Cathédrale Saint-André, 18th- to 19th-century mansions and notable art museums such as the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux. Public gardens line the curving river quays. The grand Place de la Bourse, centered on the Three Graces fountain, overlooks the Miroir d’Eau reflecting pool.Les Quais— Great for going for a nice walk on the shores of the Garonne, enjoying a ride on a ferry boat, viewing a stunning landscape over the bridges of Bordeaux, or dancing the night away in the city's many nightclubs. The Aquitaine Bridge is an architectural achievement unique in France.Do not miss the Victory Arch (Roman architecture), at the center of La Victoire and a great example of the town's Roman roots.Bordeaux is a historic city with many tourist attractions.


Strasbourg

Strasbourg

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Strasbourg is the capital city of the Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine region in northeastern France. It's also the formal seat of the European Parliament and sits near the German border, with culture and architecture blending German and French influences.Strasbourg is one of the great historic cities of Europe, and its history is very different from that of Paris.Strasbourg's gourmet traditions are quite distinctive, and more German than French. Flammekueche is something between a quiche lorraine and a pizza, and choucroute, sauerkraut in English or German, is a major speciality. Another popular dish is baeckoffe, an oven-baked meat and potato dish.  Alsace and Strasbourg are also famous for their pain d'épices, a kind of spicebread or gingerbread, particularly in the runup to Christmas. For a classic Strasbourg dining experience, visitors have a large number of Alsacian restaurants and Winstubs; the latter are typical Alsace restaurants, mostly furnished with wooden chairs and tables, decorated in Alsace style, and often housed in old half-timbered buildings.


Lyon

Lyon

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Lyon, a city in France’s historical Rhône-Alpes region, sits at the junction of the Rhône and Saône rivers. Its center reflects 2,000 years of history, with the Roman Amphithéâtre des Trois Gaules, medieval and Renaissance architecture in Vieux Lyon (Old Lyon), and the modern Confluence district on the Presqu'île peninsula. Traboules, covered passageways between buildings, connect Vieux Lyon and La Croix-Rousse hill.Eurostar’s recent launch of a direct service from St Pancras means a travel time of just four hours 41 minutes from London to Lyon. A gourmet slant is inevitable in a weekend itinerary, with the healthy sprinkling of Michelin-starred restaurants and streets packed with the traditional Lyonnaise bouchons, their red-and-white checked tabletops groaning with dishes of offal, Quennelles de brochet and unctuous St Marcellin cheeses. Culture is also high on the list, with the Musée des Confluences offering not only a new landmark for Lyons, but also a thrilling insight into mankind’s story. It sits at the meeting point of the Rhône and Saône rivers, crowning the ambitious project to regenerate the city’s previously derelict docklands.


Chamonix-Mont-Blanc

Chamonix-Mont-Blanc

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Chamonix-Mont-Blanc (usually shortened to Chamonix) is a resort area near the junction of France, Switzerland and Italy. At the base of Mont Blanc, the highest summit in the Alps, it's renowned for its skiing. Year-round, cable cars take visitors up to several nearby peaks with panoramic views, including Aiguille du Midi above town, and Pointe Helbronner, across vast glacier fields on the Italian border.Ski instructors and mountain guides come here to qualify, and every dedicated skier and snowboarder puts it on the bucket list to see how they’ll measure up to the challenge of what Chamonix calls simply “le grand ski”. The buzz is exciting and, in a macho-competitive atmosphere, can easily lead to risk-taking. The best way to get the most out of the mountain is to enrol in ski school for an off-piste course or session, or hire a professional guide who will have the experience, expertise and equipment to find the best terrain and ensure you stay safe.


 Saint Malo

Saint Malo

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Saint-Malo is a coastal city in Brittany, in France's northwest. Tall granite walls surround the old town, which was once a stronghold for privateers (pirates approved by the king). The Saint-Malo Cathedral, in the center of the old town, is built in Romanesque and Gothic styles and features stained-glass windows depicting city history.The city of St-Malo stretches beyond the Old Town to include the districts of St-Servan and Parame. The original settlement of St-Malo was located in St-Servan prior to moving to its present location and Parame is a modern seaside resort.There are some absolute delights awaiting those willing to venture a relatively short distance from the town. Mont St-Michel is located 50 km to the east, just inside neighbouring Normandy, while 20 km to the south the stunning medieval city of Dinan rises up alongside the River Rance. The surrounding Emerald Coast offers some of the most traditional seaside resorts, with pleasant sandy beaches, in this part of France.


Saint-Tropez

Saint-Tropez

Saint-Tropez - France

Saint-Tropez is a coastal town on the French Riviera, in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region of southeastern France. Long popular with artists, the town attracted the international "jet set" in the 1960s, and remains known for its beaches and nightlife. The cobblestoned La Ponche quarter recalls its past as a fishing village, although yachts now outnumber fishing boats in the Vieux Port (Old Port).The mythical village of Saint-Tropez, made famous by the actress Brigitte Bardot, attracts celebrities and visitors from all over the world. Quiet and authentic from autumn to spring, this former fishermen's village becomes in the summer a renowned seaside resort, with its lively port full of luxurious sailboats and yachts, its cafe terraces, its designer shops, and its nightclubs. Guaranteed festive and summer atmosphere! The picturesque port, lined with colourful facades, the typical district of La Ponche, and the Place des Lices, the square where the locals play boules, contribute to the village's charm. From the ramparts of the citadel, the view of the lovely church bell tower and its bright colours, the roofs of the village, and the Bay of Saint-Tropez is magnificent. Not to be missed, the Annonciade museum situated in the Notre-Dame-de-l'Annonciade chapel exhibits a collection of paintings dating from the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century.


Marseille

Marseille

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Marseille, a port city in southern France, has been a crossroads of immigration and trade since its founding by the Greeks circa 600 B.C. At its heart is the Vieux-Port (Old Port), where fishmongers sell their catch along the boat-lined quay. Basilique Notre-Dame-de-la-Garde is a Romanesque-Byzantine church.Marseille is an anytime destination. As France’s second city, it never shuts. In winter the weather may be mild enough for shirtsleeves and lunch on a terrace. Spring and autumn are generally perfect for further outdoor moments – say, walking along the glorious calanques (limestone creeks). Meanwhile, summer in the city might involve the south-side beaches followed by an al fresco evening until whatever hour you deem is bedtime.All Marseille life still focuses on the Old Port, right at the heart of the beast. It's pleasure boats only now - other stuff went round the corner to the vast commercial port decades ago - but it's where you need to start. Then you take in the Panier district - where Marseille itself and the French Connection started. he Canebière is the city's main drag, presently recovering its stateliness. And so it goes on. The fascination is endless.


Nice

Nice

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Nice, capital of the Alpes-Maritimes department on the French Riviera, sits on the pebbly shores of the Baie des Anges.The number one tourist attraction in Nice is quite clearly the sea.Nice has one of the longest and most famous beaches of the French Riviera. It's worth noting however that the beach is made of small pebbles, not sand. The old city of Nice arcs round inland from "Castle Hill", from the Promenade des Anglais to the old port.Consequently, Nice and its area have a culture and traditions that have much in common with those of Italy. While the city's many fine restaurants and hotels serve the best food in the French tradition, local specialities in and around Nice have a distinctly Italian and Mediterranean flavour.



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